Lot 195

ALFRED DRURY A.R.A. R.I. (BRITISH, 1856-1944): A BRONZE FIGURE OF A  SEATED BOY, DATED 1919
seated on a rocky, naturalistic base and drying his right foot, the back of the base signed ‘A. Drury 1919’, raised on the original green marble plinth,
the bronze 25cm high, 31.5cm high overall 

Marion Harry Spielmann summed up Drury’s enduring qualities perfectly when writing of the sculptor in 1901 when she wrote ‘Mr. Drury is among the most personal of our sculptors, always in search of the graceful, the tender, the placid, and the harmonious’. He first discovered his love for sculpture as a choir boy at New College, Oxford after seeing Chantry’s works. This inspired him to attend art school in Oxford before joining the National Art Training School, where he studied under the ground-breaking French sculptor Jules Dalou. Dalou was so impressed by his young student that when he returned to France he took Drury with him to work in his studio for the next four years. Upon Drury’s return to England, he joined the studio of another famous sculptor, Sir Edgar Boehm, who was a favourite of Queen Victoria. 

In 1885 he sent his first contribution to the Royal Academy, a group in terracotta entitled ‘The Triumph of Silenus’, but it was not until the following year when he exhibited his ideal busts at the RA that he achieved great popular success. Now considered to be a key member of the New Sculpture group of artists, his work is still well sought after; and unlike many of the mass produced bronze sculptures that were made in France during this period, his lost wax cast bronzes were not made in large quantities and come to auction relatively rarely.

RELATED LITERATURE: 
Beattie, Susan. The New Sculpture. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983.
Spielmann, Marion Harry. British Sculpture and Sculptors of Today. London: Cassell, 1901. Internet Archive. Web. 1 May 2013.

Estimate: £1,200-£1,800